Bad Wolf

Synopsis
Each Sheep has a Wolf Each Wolf has 1002 Sheep… What if one Sheep has 1002 Wolves? And each Wolf has one Sheep? Is it the same thing? How many Wolves has One Man?
  • Credits
  • Creation - Sara Henriques and Rui Rodrigues
  • Character design and Animation - João Apolinário Mendes
  • Music and Sound design - Pedro Cardoso
  • Cast - Sara Henriques
  • Costume design - Pedro Ribeiro
  • Scenography and Lighting design - Rui Rodrigues
  • Co-production - Red Cloud Teatro de Marionetas / Cineteatro de Estarreja
  • Technical rider
  • Stage black
    Backdrop black
    Total darkness
  • Presentation area
    Width - 7m
    Depth - 8m
    Height - 6m
  • Curtains
    4 to 6 legs
    2 Borders
  • Lighting
  • 5 Profile projectors 15/32
    6 PC 1Kw with barn doors
    7 Par 64 cp 62 with gel frames
  • Colors: Rosco e-color+
    104 deep amber – 2 Par
    195 zenith blue – 2 Par
    113 magenta – 2 Par
    022 dark amber – 1 Par
  • Sound
  • Mixer
    Standard stereo sound system + 2 monitors on stage
    2 mini jack stereo connections
    4 DI boxes
  • Video
  • 2 Laptops (Company's equip.)
    1 Video Projector (Company's equip.)
    1 VGA connection from control room to the back of stage
    1 Rear-projection screen 3.45X1.65m (Company's equip.)
    1 LCD Screen (Company's equip.)
    1 HDMI connection 10 meters long (Company's equip.)
  • Logistics
  • Set up 8 hours
    Dismount 1hour
  • Team - 3 people
    1 Single dressing room
  • Duration
  • 45 minutes
  • Age rating
  • Over 3 years old
  • Location
  • Black box

Bad Wolf

  • About the Show
  • Images that sometimes float, fly, hover, and fall down with all gravity's weight, with the dint of a stamp, between the absurd and the surreal mirroring the unusual holding a magnifying glass. Performed without text, within the dynamics of visual comedy and a constant interconnection between the actor and the projected animations. Coproduced by - CineTeatro de Estarreja.
    BAD WOLF
    The population is subject to living on the edge, in survival where there is no time left for questioning. It only matters consumption to generate capital, that transforms, destroys particularities of the societies and cultures of various peoples through an overwhelming globalization - for power, for money - that generates fear, distrust and superficiality among individuals. BadWolf is a theater piece focused on exploring the possibilities of communication through a visual language that generates different meanings, for the family and the general public. This show addresses issues involving the relationship of the human being with himself, starting with the phrase “Man is the Wolf of Man” It is understood the relationship between fear and politics, fear as support for the development of issues related to interests that focus little on the quality of life of the individual. Today we see people being induced into dubious contracts through a psychological game based on fear of the future, the present, and the "other." The impetus for the creation of this spectacle arises from the desire to contradict thought and common lines in the social and human perspective of right or wrong, using the “Big Bad Wolf”, which in the collective imagination has a direct correspondence with the feeling of fear or, on the other hand, of power. We then began the journey throughout the show, gradually relativizing the common idea of the big bad wolf. In the Western imagination, the wolf is the supreme representative of the other threatening and untamed nature. Throughout history, the ungovernability of wolves has given them a mythic-imaginary dimension that finds its way into slow, popular culture but surely eclipses its most objective portrayal of naturalists. (...). As the sense of ungovernability grew, wolves were publicly portrayed as being larger than they really are; they grew into giants in the American and European public imagination of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. They are also always imagined as much stronger than they are, endowed with supernatural strength. Those of us who grew up in the shadows of European culture inherited such imagery through the various European tales that embody the myth of the wolf; We all know that they cannot, at any moment, swallow our grandparents, not to mention our most beautiful and innocent girls. Today, while wolves are being rehabilitated in various "reforestation" programs, the wolf continues to provide us with a fundamental metaphor for defining those that threaten our sovereign rule. ... It can easily be said that Muslims perceive in the West today what ethno-zoologist and lobbyist Genevieve Carbone observes about wolves in Western history. There are many facts and many legends circulating about wolves, but "among facts and legends, fear has built an empire of exaggeration where they have become the eternal accused" (Carbone 1991: 14). The emotionally charged and reasonably ghostly images of the fierce killer wolf have become an integral part of the wolf's European reality. (Hage, 2017, p.9-10) Although we are aware that we live in an era in which the mechanisms of social control are transformed and adapted to technological evolution, the result of the great industrialization, this spectacle is built in a search for a match between the various social "roles", the archetypes. The motto arises following a somewhat nihilistic and progressive reflection on the essence of the human being, from a comical point of view. Without pretending to want to victimize the weaker or blame the strongest, we propose, through the plot and contemporary scenic device, an archaic but subtle window between the lines, for the perception of the human being, with the necessary distance to perceive himself, the world around him and take responsibility in his actions, contradicting the natural tendency to blame the “other”, disclaiming any actions for ignorance and obedience to the one who is considered “superior”. Fear is structural in our culture and we must live with it: we are afraid of hunger, death, violence, and power is exercised when there is on who to apply it. We have sought to arouse a provocation for the end of illusions to consciously accept or choose. In the form of questioning, or even strangeness, we have tried to break the logic of a linear narrative by exploring the poles of ambiguity and simplicity through the structure of playful mechanics. Through the urge to educate in fun and provoke questions from an early age.
    Sara Henriques (2018)
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SHOW BLACK BOX
Each Sheep has a Wolf Each Wolf has 1002 Sheep…